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Källö-Knipplas history

 

 

We who lives on Knippla is called "Knoda". Knot is a fish found along the shores of sandy bottoms down to 140 m depth. In Swedish waters is the West Coast and in v. Baltic north to Blekinge coast.

History of Knippla, written by Viola Jackson 

We who lives on Knippla is called "Knoda". Knot is a fish found along the shores of sandy bottoms down to 140 m depth. In Swedish waters is the West Coast and in v. Baltic north to Blekinge coast.

History of Knippla, written by Viola Jackson 

Knippla is on the islands in Öckerö municipality which ultimately became populated. 1778 is the first year that we know with certainty that the people lived on Källö, at the northern headland. Then a couple from Hyppeln, Magnus and Malena Persson, settled there, the couple had a son in 1778. They moved from Hyppeln to Källö was probably due to Källö belonged to the people of Hyppeln at the time, and Malena had inherited land from her father. Three families came to build houses at Källö and two families on Knippla the next few years. After a few years, more people moved to the island and built houses on Knippla, the families who originally settled at Källö moved also to Knippla.

 

It was the great herring period in the late 1790s that attracted people to settle here. When the herring period had its peak in 1809 was the resident population to about 80 people. There were three herring salting house, one at Källö, one of Linn's Bay and one at Laberget (south of the ferry situation). When the herring vanished in the early 1800s and many people left moved and left the island. In 1838 there were 11 occupied houses on the island. There were difficult years for the poor fishermen, but they fought on and in the mid-1800s were the resident population approximately 80 persons.

In 1862 it had become 16 houses and 1885 it was 35. It had been a small herring period and when the herring disappeared again - boats were bigger than after the first period so the fisherman families remained. At that time fishing-nets were used for catching fish. In the early 1900s the fishermen began with trawling. At this time the use of motors began  so they could go further out and fish.

 

People living here had built houses for them self's but there were no roads and the population had to walk on the rocks every ware. Same things with the fishing boats - no dock were used. Boats were moored to the rocks of the island. In the 17ths century logs had been arranged in the eastern harbor and a dock had then been placed over the log arrangement. In the western port a few rocks had been placed along the shore. Around the new century docks were improved, but as the boats became larger and required lager depth they had to be bayed further out.

 

The buoy was chained to a large rock. But this was not a good solution. Sometimes the boats tore away. If there was going to be a fresh breeze a major anchor was fix to the chain in addition.

To embark the boat a small jolly boat had to be used, which then was left at the buoy when the larger boat had gone fishing. This could pose great danger as when they jumped from the bigger boat down into the small. The 13th of November 1900 seven men from the boat "Lejonet" jumped in to the small boat and it capsized when the last man came onboard. Six men drowned that day.

 

Tip: buy the book "Sven remembers". Fore sale in Coop and in the  Skepshandeln.

 

      Källö-Knippla, Bohuslän

 

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